bobschofield

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

"We have a word for that in Japanese," he said. "It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally.”

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

"I don’t think it’s like the pillow word." He clapped his hands three or four times. "The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness. But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb.

Rogert Ebert, on Hayao Miyazaki (via colporteur)

murmuratio-n chos ma3a-nafsy xiv-leyli

(via cosmogyraal)

fuckyeahexistentialism

fuckyeahexistentialism:

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"Everything we care about lies somewhere in the middle, where pattern and randomness interlace."

James Gleick, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, Pantheon, 2011

"Humans are pattern-seeking story-telling animals, and we are quite adept at telling stories about…

laughterkey

laughterkey:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Kate MccGwires Feather sculptures

Kate MccGwire’s feather sculptures are awe inspiring in their detail; they are the type of thing that is marveled. Gathering, peeling, and layering are just a few ways she constructs her work. The materials, vibrant colors, and tactile quality gives them an uncanny feeling.

Oh! These make me think of the dragons in Madeleine L’Engle’s books!